THEREMINA
THEREMINA
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The New World Shopping Mall has been abandoned since 1999. It shut its doors after being condemned by local regulators. A few years later a massive fire destroyed the structure’s roof. Not long after that monsoon rains flooded the lower floors.
As a way to combat the spread of mosquitoes and other insects breeding in the stagnant water, locals introduced koi and catfish to the former mall. Not only did the fish take care of the pest problem, they’ve thrived. It is now one of the world’s largest urban ponds.
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 Aisha Zeijpvelds
 Aisha Zeijpvelds
 Aisha Zeijpvelds
 Aisha Zeijpvelds
 Aisha Zeijpvelds
 Aisha Zeijpvelds
 Aisha Zeijpvelds
 Aisha Zeijpvelds
 Aisha Zeijpvelds
 Aisha Zeijpvelds
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asylum-art:

Thirty Pieces of Silver by Cornelia Parker
Photograph by Shannon Tofts.

London-based sculptor and installation artist Cornelia Parker has an affinity for smashing things. According to her bio, the artist “is fascinated with processes in the world that mimic cartoon ‘deaths’—steamrollering, shooting full of holes, falling from cliffs and explosions.” So it makes perfect sense that in Thirty Pieces of Silver, the artist had 1,116 silver objects flattened with a steamroller so that she could turn them into this thought-provoking, suspended installation.
asylum-art:

Thirty Pieces of Silver by Cornelia Parker
Photograph by Shannon Tofts.

London-based sculptor and installation artist Cornelia Parker has an affinity for smashing things. According to her bio, the artist “is fascinated with processes in the world that mimic cartoon ‘deaths’—steamrollering, shooting full of holes, falling from cliffs and explosions.” So it makes perfect sense that in Thirty Pieces of Silver, the artist had 1,116 silver objects flattened with a steamroller so that she could turn them into this thought-provoking, suspended installation.
asylum-art:

Thirty Pieces of Silver by Cornelia Parker
Photograph by Shannon Tofts.

London-based sculptor and installation artist Cornelia Parker has an affinity for smashing things. According to her bio, the artist “is fascinated with processes in the world that mimic cartoon ‘deaths’—steamrollering, shooting full of holes, falling from cliffs and explosions.” So it makes perfect sense that in Thirty Pieces of Silver, the artist had 1,116 silver objects flattened with a steamroller so that she could turn them into this thought-provoking, suspended installation.
asylum-art:

Thirty Pieces of Silver by Cornelia Parker
Photograph by Shannon Tofts.

London-based sculptor and installation artist Cornelia Parker has an affinity for smashing things. According to her bio, the artist “is fascinated with processes in the world that mimic cartoon ‘deaths’—steamrollering, shooting full of holes, falling from cliffs and explosions.” So it makes perfect sense that in Thirty Pieces of Silver, the artist had 1,116 silver objects flattened with a steamroller so that she could turn them into this thought-provoking, suspended installation.
asylum-art:

Thirty Pieces of Silver by Cornelia Parker
Photograph by Shannon Tofts.

London-based sculptor and installation artist Cornelia Parker has an affinity for smashing things. According to her bio, the artist “is fascinated with processes in the world that mimic cartoon ‘deaths’—steamrollering, shooting full of holes, falling from cliffs and explosions.” So it makes perfect sense that in Thirty Pieces of Silver, the artist had 1,116 silver objects flattened with a steamroller so that she could turn them into this thought-provoking, suspended installation.
asylum-art:

Thirty Pieces of Silver by Cornelia Parker
Photograph by Shannon Tofts.

London-based sculptor and installation artist Cornelia Parker has an affinity for smashing things. According to her bio, the artist “is fascinated with processes in the world that mimic cartoon ‘deaths’—steamrollering, shooting full of holes, falling from cliffs and explosions.” So it makes perfect sense that in Thirty Pieces of Silver, the artist had 1,116 silver objects flattened with a steamroller so that she could turn them into this thought-provoking, suspended installation.
asylum-art:

Thirty Pieces of Silver by Cornelia Parker
Photograph by Shannon Tofts.

London-based sculptor and installation artist Cornelia Parker has an affinity for smashing things. According to her bio, the artist “is fascinated with processes in the world that mimic cartoon ‘deaths’—steamrollering, shooting full of holes, falling from cliffs and explosions.” So it makes perfect sense that in Thirty Pieces of Silver, the artist had 1,116 silver objects flattened with a steamroller so that she could turn them into this thought-provoking, suspended installation.
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asylum-art:

 Bund Sightseeing Tunnel Shanghai photographed byJakob Wagner
This psychedelic tourist trap is a leisurely descent into madness



When trying to cross the Huang Pu River in Shanghai’s bustling Bund district, you can either hop on an inexpensive metro car, or you can take a psychedelic trip through the Bund Sightseeing Tunnel.
Located under the iconic Oriental Pearl Tower, the tunnel was built to be one of the Bund’s major tourist attractions, and still manages to draw large numbers of travelers despite costing more than ten times as much as the metro. Although riders do get a rather mind-blowing (if dated) experience. After hopping into a small, futuristic rail car, riders are leisurely carried through a tunnel which is covered in pulsing, strobing lights that attempt to simulate flight through some acid-soaked version of space. The bombardment of flashing lights and colors is accompanied by a rather ominous soundtrack punctuated by an occasional intonation of English words such as “…shining star…” and “…hell…” It is unclear whether the ride is trying to evoke wonder or terror, but both reactions seem appropriate.
Despite its name, the Bund Sightseeing Tunnel offers no Shanghai sights other than its own sensory bombardment. The entire ride lasts just under five minutes, but the mind-blowing light show could have much more lasting effects
asylum-art:

 Bund Sightseeing Tunnel Shanghai photographed byJakob Wagner
This psychedelic tourist trap is a leisurely descent into madness



When trying to cross the Huang Pu River in Shanghai’s bustling Bund district, you can either hop on an inexpensive metro car, or you can take a psychedelic trip through the Bund Sightseeing Tunnel.
Located under the iconic Oriental Pearl Tower, the tunnel was built to be one of the Bund’s major tourist attractions, and still manages to draw large numbers of travelers despite costing more than ten times as much as the metro. Although riders do get a rather mind-blowing (if dated) experience. After hopping into a small, futuristic rail car, riders are leisurely carried through a tunnel which is covered in pulsing, strobing lights that attempt to simulate flight through some acid-soaked version of space. The bombardment of flashing lights and colors is accompanied by a rather ominous soundtrack punctuated by an occasional intonation of English words such as “…shining star…” and “…hell…” It is unclear whether the ride is trying to evoke wonder or terror, but both reactions seem appropriate.
Despite its name, the Bund Sightseeing Tunnel offers no Shanghai sights other than its own sensory bombardment. The entire ride lasts just under five minutes, but the mind-blowing light show could have much more lasting effects
asylum-art:

 Bund Sightseeing Tunnel Shanghai photographed byJakob Wagner
This psychedelic tourist trap is a leisurely descent into madness



When trying to cross the Huang Pu River in Shanghai’s bustling Bund district, you can either hop on an inexpensive metro car, or you can take a psychedelic trip through the Bund Sightseeing Tunnel.
Located under the iconic Oriental Pearl Tower, the tunnel was built to be one of the Bund’s major tourist attractions, and still manages to draw large numbers of travelers despite costing more than ten times as much as the metro. Although riders do get a rather mind-blowing (if dated) experience. After hopping into a small, futuristic rail car, riders are leisurely carried through a tunnel which is covered in pulsing, strobing lights that attempt to simulate flight through some acid-soaked version of space. The bombardment of flashing lights and colors is accompanied by a rather ominous soundtrack punctuated by an occasional intonation of English words such as “…shining star…” and “…hell…” It is unclear whether the ride is trying to evoke wonder or terror, but both reactions seem appropriate.
Despite its name, the Bund Sightseeing Tunnel offers no Shanghai sights other than its own sensory bombardment. The entire ride lasts just under five minutes, but the mind-blowing light show could have much more lasting effects
asylum-art:

 Bund Sightseeing Tunnel Shanghai photographed byJakob Wagner
This psychedelic tourist trap is a leisurely descent into madness



When trying to cross the Huang Pu River in Shanghai’s bustling Bund district, you can either hop on an inexpensive metro car, or you can take a psychedelic trip through the Bund Sightseeing Tunnel.
Located under the iconic Oriental Pearl Tower, the tunnel was built to be one of the Bund’s major tourist attractions, and still manages to draw large numbers of travelers despite costing more than ten times as much as the metro. Although riders do get a rather mind-blowing (if dated) experience. After hopping into a small, futuristic rail car, riders are leisurely carried through a tunnel which is covered in pulsing, strobing lights that attempt to simulate flight through some acid-soaked version of space. The bombardment of flashing lights and colors is accompanied by a rather ominous soundtrack punctuated by an occasional intonation of English words such as “…shining star…” and “…hell…” It is unclear whether the ride is trying to evoke wonder or terror, but both reactions seem appropriate.
Despite its name, the Bund Sightseeing Tunnel offers no Shanghai sights other than its own sensory bombardment. The entire ride lasts just under five minutes, but the mind-blowing light show could have much more lasting effects
asylum-art:

 Bund Sightseeing Tunnel Shanghai photographed byJakob Wagner
This psychedelic tourist trap is a leisurely descent into madness



When trying to cross the Huang Pu River in Shanghai’s bustling Bund district, you can either hop on an inexpensive metro car, or you can take a psychedelic trip through the Bund Sightseeing Tunnel.
Located under the iconic Oriental Pearl Tower, the tunnel was built to be one of the Bund’s major tourist attractions, and still manages to draw large numbers of travelers despite costing more than ten times as much as the metro. Although riders do get a rather mind-blowing (if dated) experience. After hopping into a small, futuristic rail car, riders are leisurely carried through a tunnel which is covered in pulsing, strobing lights that attempt to simulate flight through some acid-soaked version of space. The bombardment of flashing lights and colors is accompanied by a rather ominous soundtrack punctuated by an occasional intonation of English words such as “…shining star…” and “…hell…” It is unclear whether the ride is trying to evoke wonder or terror, but both reactions seem appropriate.
Despite its name, the Bund Sightseeing Tunnel offers no Shanghai sights other than its own sensory bombardment. The entire ride lasts just under five minutes, but the mind-blowing light show could have much more lasting effects
asylum-art:

 Bund Sightseeing Tunnel Shanghai photographed byJakob Wagner
This psychedelic tourist trap is a leisurely descent into madness



When trying to cross the Huang Pu River in Shanghai’s bustling Bund district, you can either hop on an inexpensive metro car, or you can take a psychedelic trip through the Bund Sightseeing Tunnel.
Located under the iconic Oriental Pearl Tower, the tunnel was built to be one of the Bund’s major tourist attractions, and still manages to draw large numbers of travelers despite costing more than ten times as much as the metro. Although riders do get a rather mind-blowing (if dated) experience. After hopping into a small, futuristic rail car, riders are leisurely carried through a tunnel which is covered in pulsing, strobing lights that attempt to simulate flight through some acid-soaked version of space. The bombardment of flashing lights and colors is accompanied by a rather ominous soundtrack punctuated by an occasional intonation of English words such as “…shining star…” and “…hell…” It is unclear whether the ride is trying to evoke wonder or terror, but both reactions seem appropriate.
Despite its name, the Bund Sightseeing Tunnel offers no Shanghai sights other than its own sensory bombardment. The entire ride lasts just under five minutes, but the mind-blowing light show could have much more lasting effects
asylum-art:

 Bund Sightseeing Tunnel Shanghai photographed byJakob Wagner
This psychedelic tourist trap is a leisurely descent into madness



When trying to cross the Huang Pu River in Shanghai’s bustling Bund district, you can either hop on an inexpensive metro car, or you can take a psychedelic trip through the Bund Sightseeing Tunnel.
Located under the iconic Oriental Pearl Tower, the tunnel was built to be one of the Bund’s major tourist attractions, and still manages to draw large numbers of travelers despite costing more than ten times as much as the metro. Although riders do get a rather mind-blowing (if dated) experience. After hopping into a small, futuristic rail car, riders are leisurely carried through a tunnel which is covered in pulsing, strobing lights that attempt to simulate flight through some acid-soaked version of space. The bombardment of flashing lights and colors is accompanied by a rather ominous soundtrack punctuated by an occasional intonation of English words such as “…shining star…” and “…hell…” It is unclear whether the ride is trying to evoke wonder or terror, but both reactions seem appropriate.
Despite its name, the Bund Sightseeing Tunnel offers no Shanghai sights other than its own sensory bombardment. The entire ride lasts just under five minutes, but the mind-blowing light show could have much more lasting effects
asylum-art:

 Bund Sightseeing Tunnel Shanghai photographed byJakob Wagner
This psychedelic tourist trap is a leisurely descent into madness



When trying to cross the Huang Pu River in Shanghai’s bustling Bund district, you can either hop on an inexpensive metro car, or you can take a psychedelic trip through the Bund Sightseeing Tunnel.
Located under the iconic Oriental Pearl Tower, the tunnel was built to be one of the Bund’s major tourist attractions, and still manages to draw large numbers of travelers despite costing more than ten times as much as the metro. Although riders do get a rather mind-blowing (if dated) experience. After hopping into a small, futuristic rail car, riders are leisurely carried through a tunnel which is covered in pulsing, strobing lights that attempt to simulate flight through some acid-soaked version of space. The bombardment of flashing lights and colors is accompanied by a rather ominous soundtrack punctuated by an occasional intonation of English words such as “…shining star…” and “…hell…” It is unclear whether the ride is trying to evoke wonder or terror, but both reactions seem appropriate.
Despite its name, the Bund Sightseeing Tunnel offers no Shanghai sights other than its own sensory bombardment. The entire ride lasts just under five minutes, but the mind-blowing light show could have much more lasting effects
asylum-art:

 Bund Sightseeing Tunnel Shanghai photographed byJakob Wagner
This psychedelic tourist trap is a leisurely descent into madness



When trying to cross the Huang Pu River in Shanghai’s bustling Bund district, you can either hop on an inexpensive metro car, or you can take a psychedelic trip through the Bund Sightseeing Tunnel.
Located under the iconic Oriental Pearl Tower, the tunnel was built to be one of the Bund’s major tourist attractions, and still manages to draw large numbers of travelers despite costing more than ten times as much as the metro. Although riders do get a rather mind-blowing (if dated) experience. After hopping into a small, futuristic rail car, riders are leisurely carried through a tunnel which is covered in pulsing, strobing lights that attempt to simulate flight through some acid-soaked version of space. The bombardment of flashing lights and colors is accompanied by a rather ominous soundtrack punctuated by an occasional intonation of English words such as “…shining star…” and “…hell…” It is unclear whether the ride is trying to evoke wonder or terror, but both reactions seem appropriate.
Despite its name, the Bund Sightseeing Tunnel offers no Shanghai sights other than its own sensory bombardment. The entire ride lasts just under five minutes, but the mind-blowing light show could have much more lasting effects
asylum-art:

 Bund Sightseeing Tunnel Shanghai photographed byJakob Wagner
This psychedelic tourist trap is a leisurely descent into madness



When trying to cross the Huang Pu River in Shanghai’s bustling Bund district, you can either hop on an inexpensive metro car, or you can take a psychedelic trip through the Bund Sightseeing Tunnel.
Located under the iconic Oriental Pearl Tower, the tunnel was built to be one of the Bund’s major tourist attractions, and still manages to draw large numbers of travelers despite costing more than ten times as much as the metro. Although riders do get a rather mind-blowing (if dated) experience. After hopping into a small, futuristic rail car, riders are leisurely carried through a tunnel which is covered in pulsing, strobing lights that attempt to simulate flight through some acid-soaked version of space. The bombardment of flashing lights and colors is accompanied by a rather ominous soundtrack punctuated by an occasional intonation of English words such as “…shining star…” and “…hell…” It is unclear whether the ride is trying to evoke wonder or terror, but both reactions seem appropriate.
Despite its name, the Bund Sightseeing Tunnel offers no Shanghai sights other than its own sensory bombardment. The entire ride lasts just under five minutes, but the mind-blowing light show could have much more lasting effects
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Home again, home again, jiggety jig. Good evening, SF.  (at Bay Bridge)
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magictransistor:

Dorothy W. Wilson, Bridge Babies, 1961.
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magictransistor:

The Lives and Times of Captain Beefheart (David Britton), Babylon Books, Manchester, UK, 1977.
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omgthatdress:

Ensemble
Pierre Cardin, 1967
The Victoria & Albert Museum
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wave by (caballero04)
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nevver:

Everybody’s got a thing
nevver:

Everybody’s got a thing
nevver:

Everybody’s got a thing
nevver:

Everybody’s got a thing
nevver:

Everybody’s got a thing
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Tauba AuerbachMesh/Moire IV, 2012Color aquatint etching40 1/4 x 30 in.
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laughing so hard right now
laughing so hard right now