THEREMINA
THEREMINA
+
ikenoikeo:

(via Flat style illustrations by Japanese artist Kotaro Chiba ‹ Neyeni.Net)
+
magnusatom:

The artists over at Pictoplasma academy are producing some pretty amazing stuff.
magnusatom:

The artists over at Pictoplasma academy are producing some pretty amazing stuff.
magnusatom:

The artists over at Pictoplasma academy are producing some pretty amazing stuff.
magnusatom:

The artists over at Pictoplasma academy are producing some pretty amazing stuff.
magnusatom:

The artists over at Pictoplasma academy are producing some pretty amazing stuff.
magnusatom:

The artists over at Pictoplasma academy are producing some pretty amazing stuff.
+
benfoldsone:

okaysizedbangtheory:

you done it

congration
+
m1k3y:

love-3000:

prostheticknowledge:

The Sword of Damocles
Early pioneering tech from 1968 is a stereoscopic headmounted display created by Ivan Sutherland, the first Virtual Reality technology:

Computer graphics pioneer Ivan Sutherland models a stereoscopic display he created at Harvard using miniature TV tubes. An early application showed a three-dimensional wire-frame virtual room that users could explore by moving their heads.

I couldn’t locate a demonstration of the wireframe rooms (but if anyone knows … let me know!)
Images above are from the Computer History Museum here and here
Papers written by Ivan Sutherland from 1965 on the subject can be found here and here

〰 Wow, I didn’t know it was that small already! In 1968!

Hail the Godfather
m1k3y:

love-3000:

prostheticknowledge:

The Sword of Damocles
Early pioneering tech from 1968 is a stereoscopic headmounted display created by Ivan Sutherland, the first Virtual Reality technology:

Computer graphics pioneer Ivan Sutherland models a stereoscopic display he created at Harvard using miniature TV tubes. An early application showed a three-dimensional wire-frame virtual room that users could explore by moving their heads.

I couldn’t locate a demonstration of the wireframe rooms (but if anyone knows … let me know!)
Images above are from the Computer History Museum here and here
Papers written by Ivan Sutherland from 1965 on the subject can be found here and here

〰 Wow, I didn’t know it was that small already! In 1968!

Hail the Godfather
m1k3y:

love-3000:

prostheticknowledge:

The Sword of Damocles
Early pioneering tech from 1968 is a stereoscopic headmounted display created by Ivan Sutherland, the first Virtual Reality technology:

Computer graphics pioneer Ivan Sutherland models a stereoscopic display he created at Harvard using miniature TV tubes. An early application showed a three-dimensional wire-frame virtual room that users could explore by moving their heads.

I couldn’t locate a demonstration of the wireframe rooms (but if anyone knows … let me know!)
Images above are from the Computer History Museum here and here
Papers written by Ivan Sutherland from 1965 on the subject can be found here and here

〰 Wow, I didn’t know it was that small already! In 1968!

Hail the Godfather
m1k3y:

love-3000:

prostheticknowledge:

The Sword of Damocles
Early pioneering tech from 1968 is a stereoscopic headmounted display created by Ivan Sutherland, the first Virtual Reality technology:

Computer graphics pioneer Ivan Sutherland models a stereoscopic display he created at Harvard using miniature TV tubes. An early application showed a three-dimensional wire-frame virtual room that users could explore by moving their heads.

I couldn’t locate a demonstration of the wireframe rooms (but if anyone knows … let me know!)
Images above are from the Computer History Museum here and here
Papers written by Ivan Sutherland from 1965 on the subject can be found here and here

〰 Wow, I didn’t know it was that small already! In 1968!

Hail the Godfather
m1k3y:

love-3000:

prostheticknowledge:

The Sword of Damocles
Early pioneering tech from 1968 is a stereoscopic headmounted display created by Ivan Sutherland, the first Virtual Reality technology:

Computer graphics pioneer Ivan Sutherland models a stereoscopic display he created at Harvard using miniature TV tubes. An early application showed a three-dimensional wire-frame virtual room that users could explore by moving their heads.

I couldn’t locate a demonstration of the wireframe rooms (but if anyone knows … let me know!)
Images above are from the Computer History Museum here and here
Papers written by Ivan Sutherland from 1965 on the subject can be found here and here

〰 Wow, I didn’t know it was that small already! In 1968!

Hail the Godfather
+
nati-art:

_MG_9949-3 (by Tennoji Kun)
+
gasoline-station:

Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex
Via
A huge pyramid in the middle of nowhere tracking the end of the world on radar. An abstract geometric shape beneath the sky without a human being in sight. It could be the opening scene of an apocalyptic science fiction film, but it’s just the U.S. military going about its business, building vast and other-worldly architectural structures that the civilian world only rarely sees.
The Library of Congress has an extraordinary set of images documenting the Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex in Cavalier County, North Dakota, showing it in various states of construction and completion.
Taken for the U.S. government by photographer Benjamin Halpern, the particular images seen here show the central pyramid—pyramid, obelisk, monument, megastructure: whatever you want to call it—that served as the site’s missile control building. Like the eye of Sauron crossed with Giza, it looks in all directions, its all-seeing white circles staring endlessly at invisible airborne objects across the horizon.
gasoline-station:

Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex
Via
A huge pyramid in the middle of nowhere tracking the end of the world on radar. An abstract geometric shape beneath the sky without a human being in sight. It could be the opening scene of an apocalyptic science fiction film, but it’s just the U.S. military going about its business, building vast and other-worldly architectural structures that the civilian world only rarely sees.
The Library of Congress has an extraordinary set of images documenting the Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex in Cavalier County, North Dakota, showing it in various states of construction and completion.
Taken for the U.S. government by photographer Benjamin Halpern, the particular images seen here show the central pyramid—pyramid, obelisk, monument, megastructure: whatever you want to call it—that served as the site’s missile control building. Like the eye of Sauron crossed with Giza, it looks in all directions, its all-seeing white circles staring endlessly at invisible airborne objects across the horizon.
gasoline-station:

Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex
Via
A huge pyramid in the middle of nowhere tracking the end of the world on radar. An abstract geometric shape beneath the sky without a human being in sight. It could be the opening scene of an apocalyptic science fiction film, but it’s just the U.S. military going about its business, building vast and other-worldly architectural structures that the civilian world only rarely sees.
The Library of Congress has an extraordinary set of images documenting the Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex in Cavalier County, North Dakota, showing it in various states of construction and completion.
Taken for the U.S. government by photographer Benjamin Halpern, the particular images seen here show the central pyramid—pyramid, obelisk, monument, megastructure: whatever you want to call it—that served as the site’s missile control building. Like the eye of Sauron crossed with Giza, it looks in all directions, its all-seeing white circles staring endlessly at invisible airborne objects across the horizon.
gasoline-station:

Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex
Via
A huge pyramid in the middle of nowhere tracking the end of the world on radar. An abstract geometric shape beneath the sky without a human being in sight. It could be the opening scene of an apocalyptic science fiction film, but it’s just the U.S. military going about its business, building vast and other-worldly architectural structures that the civilian world only rarely sees.
The Library of Congress has an extraordinary set of images documenting the Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex in Cavalier County, North Dakota, showing it in various states of construction and completion.
Taken for the U.S. government by photographer Benjamin Halpern, the particular images seen here show the central pyramid—pyramid, obelisk, monument, megastructure: whatever you want to call it—that served as the site’s missile control building. Like the eye of Sauron crossed with Giza, it looks in all directions, its all-seeing white circles staring endlessly at invisible airborne objects across the horizon.
gasoline-station:

Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex
Via
A huge pyramid in the middle of nowhere tracking the end of the world on radar. An abstract geometric shape beneath the sky without a human being in sight. It could be the opening scene of an apocalyptic science fiction film, but it’s just the U.S. military going about its business, building vast and other-worldly architectural structures that the civilian world only rarely sees.
The Library of Congress has an extraordinary set of images documenting the Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex in Cavalier County, North Dakota, showing it in various states of construction and completion.
Taken for the U.S. government by photographer Benjamin Halpern, the particular images seen here show the central pyramid—pyramid, obelisk, monument, megastructure: whatever you want to call it—that served as the site’s missile control building. Like the eye of Sauron crossed with Giza, it looks in all directions, its all-seeing white circles staring endlessly at invisible airborne objects across the horizon.
gasoline-station:

Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex
Via
A huge pyramid in the middle of nowhere tracking the end of the world on radar. An abstract geometric shape beneath the sky without a human being in sight. It could be the opening scene of an apocalyptic science fiction film, but it’s just the U.S. military going about its business, building vast and other-worldly architectural structures that the civilian world only rarely sees.
The Library of Congress has an extraordinary set of images documenting the Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex in Cavalier County, North Dakota, showing it in various states of construction and completion.
Taken for the U.S. government by photographer Benjamin Halpern, the particular images seen here show the central pyramid—pyramid, obelisk, monument, megastructure: whatever you want to call it—that served as the site’s missile control building. Like the eye of Sauron crossed with Giza, it looks in all directions, its all-seeing white circles staring endlessly at invisible airborne objects across the horizon.
gasoline-station:

Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex
Via
A huge pyramid in the middle of nowhere tracking the end of the world on radar. An abstract geometric shape beneath the sky without a human being in sight. It could be the opening scene of an apocalyptic science fiction film, but it’s just the U.S. military going about its business, building vast and other-worldly architectural structures that the civilian world only rarely sees.
The Library of Congress has an extraordinary set of images documenting the Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex in Cavalier County, North Dakota, showing it in various states of construction and completion.
Taken for the U.S. government by photographer Benjamin Halpern, the particular images seen here show the central pyramid—pyramid, obelisk, monument, megastructure: whatever you want to call it—that served as the site’s missile control building. Like the eye of Sauron crossed with Giza, it looks in all directions, its all-seeing white circles staring endlessly at invisible airborne objects across the horizon.
gasoline-station:

Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex
Via
A huge pyramid in the middle of nowhere tracking the end of the world on radar. An abstract geometric shape beneath the sky without a human being in sight. It could be the opening scene of an apocalyptic science fiction film, but it’s just the U.S. military going about its business, building vast and other-worldly architectural structures that the civilian world only rarely sees.
The Library of Congress has an extraordinary set of images documenting the Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex in Cavalier County, North Dakota, showing it in various states of construction and completion.
Taken for the U.S. government by photographer Benjamin Halpern, the particular images seen here show the central pyramid—pyramid, obelisk, monument, megastructure: whatever you want to call it—that served as the site’s missile control building. Like the eye of Sauron crossed with Giza, it looks in all directions, its all-seeing white circles staring endlessly at invisible airborne objects across the horizon.
+
+
zdarsky:

HOLY COWToday’s the day! SEX CRIMINALS: ONE WEIRD TRICK is out! AND it’s only $9.99! MADNESS.I’ll be doing a signing at The Beguiling from 6pm-9pm tonight AND, SURPRISE, a noon-1pm signing at Silver Snail on Yonge!
So, you may have some questions. Here I am to answer them.Chip, I already bought issues 1-5, why the fuck would I buy this?
Great question! Don’t appreciate the cussing!Well, THIS volume has fun backup stuff, like our MASTER SEX MOVE LIST, process pages, a radio drama, Hardon Fink outtakes, and the cute doodles above! Also, its $9.99! Buy TWO.The why the fuck did I buy the individual issues?
Again, please stop cussing.Because you’re a true supporter of the comic arts and you don’t want shit spoiled like its Game of Thrones night on twitter. Also, our fun letters pages are NOT in the collection! Those are fun, yeah? Sure are!
Thanks, Chip, you’re a fuckin’ cutie.THAT IS ACCEPTABLE CUSSING.
Also, yesterday SEXCRIMZ was nominated for Eisner Awards in the Best New Series and Best Continuing Series categories. AND Matt is up for Best Writer, against his wife, which means I get to sit at their table in San Diego and see how that plays out! This is all amazing and I’m overwhelmed by everyone’s support for our pee-pee hoo-hah comic. I know I make a lot of jokes here on tumblr.com, but it really means a lot. Thanks, guys.Love,Chip
+
+
+
+
+
+
thugkitchen:

Looking for that perfect grocery bag? Not anymore.
Check out Thug Kitchen’s new merch store. You’re fucking welcome.
+
thebullmonkey:

pattnson:

I’m sorry. Did I step on your button?
⇒ Natasha Romanoff in Captain America: The Winter Soldier

This is the best Black Widow hair so far. I hope they keep it for Avengers 2.
thebullmonkey:

pattnson:

I’m sorry. Did I step on your button?
⇒ Natasha Romanoff in Captain America: The Winter Soldier

This is the best Black Widow hair so far. I hope they keep it for Avengers 2.
thebullmonkey:

pattnson:

I’m sorry. Did I step on your button?
⇒ Natasha Romanoff in Captain America: The Winter Soldier

This is the best Black Widow hair so far. I hope they keep it for Avengers 2.
thebullmonkey:

pattnson:

I’m sorry. Did I step on your button?
⇒ Natasha Romanoff in Captain America: The Winter Soldier

This is the best Black Widow hair so far. I hope they keep it for Avengers 2.
thebullmonkey:

pattnson:

I’m sorry. Did I step on your button?
⇒ Natasha Romanoff in Captain America: The Winter Soldier

This is the best Black Widow hair so far. I hope they keep it for Avengers 2.
thebullmonkey:

pattnson:

I’m sorry. Did I step on your button?
⇒ Natasha Romanoff in Captain America: The Winter Soldier

This is the best Black Widow hair so far. I hope they keep it for Avengers 2.
thebullmonkey:

pattnson:

I’m sorry. Did I step on your button?
⇒ Natasha Romanoff in Captain America: The Winter Soldier

This is the best Black Widow hair so far. I hope they keep it for Avengers 2.
thebullmonkey:

pattnson:

I’m sorry. Did I step on your button?
⇒ Natasha Romanoff in Captain America: The Winter Soldier

This is the best Black Widow hair so far. I hope they keep it for Avengers 2.